library life

NEWS FLASH: Book Returned to Library

Ever since becoming a librarian, I have developed a couple of pet peeves. One of them, is the need for local news outlets to sensationalize the relatively common library event of a book being returned to the library. I can sort of see how people think it’s so rare and newsworthy, as these books are old and many years overdue. But they all go the same — the library staff is surprised and delighted to get a book back, the patron frequently does it anonymously out of embarrassment or own up to their guilt and offer to pay the overdue fee, the overdue fee is calculated by the old library fee system or the modern one (though the patron is never asked to pay it), and the news story gets linked on my Facebook page by three people within 24 hours, and by a handful of people over the next eight months until another library gets an old book returned to the library and the cycle starts all over again.

My current library recently was the receiving end of one of these old books being returned to the library. The book dated from the 1890s, it had been checked out at least 40 years ago at a previous location, and while the author was somewhat notable in some circles, the book itself was not worth much. We put it up on Instagram, and by the end of the day the local news station had tweeted about it, and then a couple days later popped by for a TV news spot on it. I was the lucky devil who happened to be the supervisor our absent director picked to be the talking head with regards to this book that had been returned to the library.

Sadly I did not make the news – while I was sent on a wild goose chase to find the book in question somewhere in my director’s office, one of my co-workers with far more knowledge about the history of the library was mic’d and did the honors. My hands picking up the book for a shot and my laugh made the news spot and I’m perfectly content with that. But the thing that absolutely bothered me was that we had a HUGE Star Wars Day event that night, we were all wearing shirts for it, and the local news anchor didn’t mention it.

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librarian, Uncategorized

The Struggle is Real: Library Patron vs. Email

girl-1064658_1920This is a daily occurrence while at the Reference Desk at my public library. I’m not even joking. I have some version of this exchange almost every day at the Reference Desk.

Patron: Can you help me? I can’t get this dumb thing to work.
Me: Okay, sure. What are you trying to do?
Patron: I need to get into my email to print something, and it won’t let me!
Me: Okay, you’re already logged in the computer, so just double click on a browser to get on the Internet.
Patron: I just double click on a browser?
Me: Yes.
Patron: Which one? [choice of Internet Explorer or Google Chrome]
Me: Doesn’t matter. [I know it does, but they wouldn’t understand if I tried to explain it]
Patron: But which one? Internet?
Me: [resignedly] Sure.
Patron: [clicks scroll wheel on mouse repeatedly]
Me: No, no, click it on the left side.
Patron: The left side?
Me: Yes.
Patron: [gingerly moves hand on top of computer mouse, gently clicks left side of mouse]
Me: You have to double click it.
Patron: [clicks twice slowly, achieves moving icon down a little]
Me: Here, try this. Click it once…
Patron: [clicks it once]
Me: … Now hit ‘enter.’
Patron: Hit ‘enter’?
Me: Yes.
Patron: This right here? [finger hovers over ‘enter’ key]
Me: Yes.
Patron: [hits ‘enter’]

Browser then opens to the library website as the default homepage.

Patron: It did this before! I don’t know what this is!
Me: This is just the library website. You just type where you want to go up at the top.
Patron: I want to go to my email!
Me: What email do you use?
Patron: What?
Me: Is it Gmail, Hotmail, AOL, Yahoo…?
Patron: Oh, um, Yahoo. [it’s always Yahoo]
Me: Okay, type in Yahoo .com up at the top here.
Patron: Up here? [points at address bar]
Me: Yes, there.
Patron: [starts typing in full email address]
Me: No, no, just Yahoo .com.
Patron: But I need to get to my email address!
Me: Right, but first you have to go to Yahoo .com, and THEN you can get to your email.
Patron: [gives me a look like they don’t believe me, types in Yahoo .com, then stares blankly at the screen]
Me: Hit ‘enter’
Patron: Hit ‘enter’?
Me: Yes.
Patron: [hits ‘enter,’ browser goes to Yahoo] Oh, yay!
Me: Okay, now click ‘Mail.’
Patron: Click ‘Mail’?
Me: Yes.
Patron: [clicks ‘Mail’]
Me: Now type in your email here. [Indicates screen]
Patron: Type it in here? [Points at screen]
Me: Yes.
Patron: My whole email?
Me: Yes.
Patron: [Uses search-and-destroy method to slowly type out their email, not knowing where the “@” symbol is, and inevitably getting at least two letters wrong]
Me: Okay, now type in your password here. [Indicates space under email address]
Patron: My password?
Me: Yes.
Patron: What if I don’t remember my password?
Me: Well, you need your password to access your email.
Patron: I do? But I don’t need it on my phone!
Me: Right, because your phone is set up so you’re always logged in. But these are public computers, so lots of people access their email through them.
Patron: [putters, contemplating this] Okay, maybe I remember it. [starts typing in a password]

This could go on for some minutes while the patron maybe remembers their password or does not and gets increasingly more frustrated. If they do manage to log in —

Patron: [has over 5,000 unread messages in email inbox] There it is! Thank you! I just don’t get these machines!

If they don’t remember their password, I attempt to help them reset it, but they never remember a recently used password, backup email, or answers to security questions, and 9 times out of 10 decide whatever they needed to print wasn’t really that important and storm off.

Now, helping a patron to print something from their email is a whole other story.