librarian, Uncategorized

The Struggle is Real: Library Patron vs. Email

girl-1064658_1920This is a daily occurrence while at the Reference Desk at my public library. I’m not even joking. I have some version of this exchange almost every day at the Reference Desk.

Patron: Can you help me? I can’t get this dumb thing to work.
Me: Okay, sure. What are you trying to do?
Patron: I need to get into my email to print something, and it won’t let me!
Me: Okay, you’re already logged in the computer, so just double click on a browser to get on the Internet.
Patron: I just double click on a browser?
Me: Yes.
Patron: Which one? [choice of Internet Explorer or Google Chrome]
Me: Doesn’t matter. [I know it does, but they wouldn’t understand if I tried to explain it]
Patron: But which one? Internet?
Me: [resignedly] Sure.
Patron: [clicks scroll wheel on mouse repeatedly]
Me: No, no, click it on the left side.
Patron: The left side?
Me: Yes.
Patron: [gingerly moves hand on top of computer mouse, gently clicks left side of mouse]
Me: You have to double click it.
Patron: [clicks twice slowly, achieves moving icon down a little]
Me: Here, try this. Click it once…
Patron: [clicks it once]
Me: … Now hit ‘enter.’
Patron: Hit ‘enter’?
Me: Yes.
Patron: This right here? [finger hovers over ‘enter’ key]
Me: Yes.
Patron: [hits ‘enter’]

Browser then opens to the library website as the default homepage.

Patron: It did this before! I don’t know what this is!
Me: This is just the library website. You just type where you want to go up at the top.
Patron: I want to go to my email!
Me: What email do you use?
Patron: What?
Me: Is it Gmail, Hotmail, AOL, Yahoo…?
Patron: Oh, um, Yahoo. [it’s always Yahoo]
Me: Okay, type in Yahoo .com up at the top here.
Patron: Up here? [points at address bar]
Me: Yes, there.
Patron: [starts typing in full email address]
Me: No, no, just Yahoo .com.
Patron: But I need to get to my email address!
Me: Right, but first you have to go to Yahoo .com, and THEN you can get to your email.
Patron: [gives me a look like they don’t believe me, types in Yahoo .com, then stares blankly at the screen]
Me: Hit ‘enter’
Patron: Hit ‘enter’?
Me: Yes.
Patron: [hits ‘enter,’ browser goes to Yahoo] Oh, yay!
Me: Okay, now click ‘Mail.’
Patron: Click ‘Mail’?
Me: Yes.
Patron: [clicks ‘Mail’]
Me: Now type in your email here. [Indicates screen]
Patron: Type it in here? [Points at screen]
Me: Yes.
Patron: My whole email?
Me: Yes.
Patron: [Uses search-and-destroy method to slowly type out their email, not knowing where the “@” symbol is, and inevitably getting at least two letters wrong]
Me: Okay, now type in your password here. [Indicates space under email address]
Patron: My password?
Me: Yes.
Patron: What if I don’t remember my password?
Me: Well, you need your password to access your email.
Patron: I do? But I don’t need it on my phone!
Me: Right, because your phone is set up so you’re always logged in. But these are public computers, so lots of people access their email through them.
Patron: [putters, contemplating this] Okay, maybe I remember it. [starts typing in a password]

This could go on for some minutes while the patron maybe remembers their password or does not and gets increasingly more frustrated. If they do manage to log in —

Patron: [has over 5,000 unread messages in email inbox] There it is! Thank you! I just don’t get these machines!

If they don’t remember their password, I attempt to help them reset it, but they never remember a recently used password, backup email, or answers to security questions, and 9 times out of 10 decide whatever they needed to print wasn’t really that important and storm off.

Now, helping a patron to print something from their email is a whole other story.

Advertisements
book life

My love/hate relationship with BookTube

So as I stated in my last post, I recently discovered BookTube. I am both intrigued and annoyed by the phenomenon of BookTube. I love it for showcasing lots of great books, and getting the enthusiasm from other book lovers rubbed off on you. But there are a couple of things that really get under my skin about the BookTube community (at least what I have seen of it thus far):

“This book is SO GOOD. UH. SO GOOD. I JUST LOVE IT. And this cover is GORGEOUS.”
This is about 90% of the reviews I have seen. Just unleashed giddiness. But as a potential reader, I would like to know WHY do you find it a good read? What is the plot? Did characters stand out? Was the writing evocative? What other books are like it? What kind of reader might like this book? As a book professional for a number of years, I find this extremely lacking, and not good sells at all. If a publisher or author is sending you a review or even finished copy of a book, I would think you owe them a little more time and space in your videos. Which leads me to my second point…

“LOOK AT ALL THE BOOKS I GOT.”
I get book hauls. I do. But these BookTubers… they seem more materialistic than anything. They get sent books for review, sure, but they also buy books like crazy, and might buy three copies of the same book because they want the UK cover and the new reboot cover in addition to the one they actually read. Some people are book collectors, and I get it, but I also get annoyed with all these book haul videos that number DOZENS of books that these BookTubers cannot possibly read. I just seem them as greedy teens who are being reckless with daddy’s money. YES, I do see a number of review videos, but that leads me to my third point….

All YA. Almost nothing but YA.
I like YA. I do! But I’m very selective with the YA I read because I find much of it fluff, and I’m in charge of Adult Fiction purchasing at my library, so that’s what I pay the most attention to. So I get bored super fast with the majority of BookTube videos that just gush about YA titles. Where are the literary fiction BookTubers? If they do go into literary fiction, it’s mixed in with YA, and it’s frequently something like, “what classic books should I read?” *sigh* Again.

I wish there were more vibrant librarians on BookTube. Book professionals who know how to book talk, and have some method to the madness of book accumulation. Avid readers of adult fiction who can speak more authoritatively about it than just on dead white guys. Librarians who know their stuff, yet can also command a video camera with enthusiasm like the best young BookTubers. Many librarian book talk videos are of poor quality, and have not particularly inviting women (not many guys in general) talking about books. That’s also boring. And after a few solid updates, they stop having the time or energy to keep producing and uploading videos. Many of the reader’s advisory librarians are busy doing their jobs, or posting useful blog links, and are thus not able or equipped to make BookTube videos. But it’s still my wish.

Le sigh. I’m not the kind of person to actually make this change, I just know what needs to be done. That can be an annoying position for everyone. But I hope some more outgoing and experimental librarian tries to tackle an unexplored area of BookTube!